You can’t have more than six panels on a page!

Or so the old adage goes. Since I have gotten back into writing comics I’ve fallen into the trap of writing too many panels in my comics. This has resulted in feedback from other writers stating that artists will see the job as tedious or worse yet, me being naive about not giving enough breathing room for the art to take centre stage.

I went back to my recent draft of Resurrection Men #1 and looked at my pages with my analytical hat. Was I showing my inexperience or could a writer really be successful with more than a certain number of panels per page?

3589583-ultimate+spider-man+43-07So I picked up my most recent read, Ultimate Spider-Man by Brian Michael Bendis and I noticed that he often writes for nine or ten panels per page. This is one of the most successful writers currently at Marvel so by this logic surely there doesn’t need to be a hard limit on how many panels you need for a page. The page to the left really was a great example of how a large number of panels can quickly tell a story without the need of excess dialogue.

 

avengers-finaleThis page from the “Avengers Disassembled” storyline was in fact very powerful because it showcased the emotional wellbeing of all the characters whilst simultaneously giving each character a line of dialogue that expressed their feelings towards the end of an era. However, I’m not trying to dismiss the logic between limited panels. In fact it really helps as a writer to look at a page with many different panels and see what really is important and condense the essence of the story into as few as panels as possible.

The example below comes from between two drafts of Resurrection Men #1.

12

In the first example you can see there was a lot of dialogue and going back and forth between Camael and James. When I added it up it came up to 10 panels in total! So I thought to myself, how can I keep the jist of this story and scene but cut the panels. This was my solution below.

1 Redone2 redone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suddenly a lot smoother and heck of lot more interesting visually. I 02_cemanaged to keep the feel of story but also gave room for the art to be the certain of attention.

So I guess this one golden rule can be broken, if it is broken for the right reason. I’ll leave you with a poor example of panels from Scott McCloud’s “Understanding Comics”, a great read you should pick up.

All the best,

N. S. Paul

Wednesday Support – Comic balloons & clarity

Evening all,

My journey to developing as a comic writer and letterer led me to do a lot of research on how to develop different skills. I thought I would start sharing those online posts that have helped me in the interests that it might help others with their own work.

This tutorial has great information about placement of word balloons within your comic. This particular article comes from IDW published writer and artist Lora Innes. You can check out her online comic, The Dreamer here,  buy it here and her twitter here.

All the best,

N. S. Paul

Comic Layout Tutorial: Comic Balloons & Clarity

Guardian Angel – Prologue – Editing & Translation Job

1e169nzeax1EzTSo welcome to my first blog and my first job! “Guardian Angel” is written by Pamela Marins and this was my first job at translating and editing someone else’s work.

One of the challenges I came across when I took on this project was trying to keep the intent of the writers original non English dialogue. The piece was originally in Portuguese and then translated into English through google translate, so I also had to take some liberties when developing the dialogue that created a bit of flavour to the characters personalities.

I’ll be updating the first chapter of Pamela’s work next Sunday and I will create a CBR download for you to read it in your preferred comic reading app.

This was a fun project and I recommend you check it out. You can view her webcomic below.

Guardian Angel

When you do nip over, please consider being a patron of her work.

All the best,

N.S. Paul